Date
15 January 2009
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cessna Debuts 350 Corvalis and 400 Corvalis TT

WICHITA, Kan., Jan. 15, 2009 – Cessna Aircraft Company, a Textron Inc. (NYSE: TXT) company, introduced the 350 Corvalis and 400 Corvalis TT during this year’s annual sales meeting in Wichita.

The Cessna 350 Corvalis and 400 Corvalis TT (twin turbocharged), formerly the Cessna 350 and Cessna 400 respectively, have been renamed as part of Cessna’s acquisition of certain assets from Columbia Aircraft Manufacturing Company in 2007.

“Our customers and sales team asked us to name these products like other popular Cessnas such as the Cardinal and Skyhawk. The name Corvalis, although spelled differently, was inspired from the name of a picturesque Oregon town about 120 miles west of Cessna’s Bend, Ore. manufacturing facility.  It is a graceful word befitting the flowing lines of the aircraft and its unique Northwest heritage,” said Tom Aniello, vice president of marketing.

“The logo graphic evokes a stylized depiction of the Three Sisters mountains, part of the Cascade mountain range separating the Eastern and Western halves of Oregon, and clearly visible from Cessna’s Bend facility,” Aniello said.

At a maximum cruise speed of 235 knots, the Cessna 400 Corvalis TT is the fastest fixed-gear single-engine piston aircraft on the market. Equipped with a 310-horsepower Teledyne Continental TCM IO-550N, the Cessna 350 Corvalis has a certified ceiling of 18,000 feet and a maximum cruise speed of 190 knots. The twin turbocharger equipped, intercooled TCM TSIO-550C installed in the Cessna 400 Corvalis TT enables it to cruise as high as 25,000 feet while its pilot and passengers enjoy the convenience of the 400’s standard 4-place, built-in oxygen system.

Like all current Cessna single-engine piston products, the Caravan and the Citation Mustang, the 350 Corvalis and 400 Corvalis TT are equipped with the integrated Garmin G1000 avionics system and GFC700 autopilot, and are backed by Cessna’s extensive support network.

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Based on unit sales, Cessna Aircraft Company is the world’s largest manufacturer of general aviation airplanes. In 2007, Cessna delivered 1,272 aircraft, including 387 Citation business jets, and reported revenues of about $5 billion. Cessna has a backlog of $15.6 billion as of September 30, 2008. Since the company was originally established in 1927, some 191,000 Cessna airplanes have been delivered around the world, including more than 5,400 Citations, making it the largest fleet of business jets in the world. More information about Cessna Aircraft Company is available at http://www.cessna.com.

Textron Inc. (NYSE:  TXT) is a $12.6 billion multi-industry company operating in 28 countries with approximately 42,000 employees.  The company leverages its global network of aircraft, defense and intelligence, industrial and finance businesses to provide customers with innovative solutions and services. Textron is known around the world for its powerful brands such as Bell Helicopter, Cessna Aircraft Company, Jacobsen, Kautex, Lycoming, E-Z-GO, Greenlee, Textron Systems and Textron Financial Corporation.  More information is available at www.textron.com.

Forward-looking Information: Certain statements in this release are forward-looking statements and speak only as of the date on which they are made, and we undertake no obligation to update or revise any forward-looking statements. These forward-looking statements are subject to risks and uncertainties that may cause actual results to differ materially from those contained in the statements, including but not limited to the following: [a] changes in worldwide economic and political conditions that impact demand for our products, interest rates and foreign exchange rates; [b] the interruption of production at our facilities or at our suppliers’ facilities; [c] the timing of new product launches and certifications of new aircraft products; [d] the occurrence of slowdowns or downturns in customer markets in which our products are sold or supplied; [e] changes in aircraft delivery schedules or cancellation of orders; [f] the launching of significant new products or programs which could result in unanticipated expenses; [g] changes in national or international government policies on the export and import of commercial products; and [h] bankruptcy or other financial problems at major suppliers that could cause disruptions in our supply chain.

Marc Cornelius

Managing Director & Founder

Marc has over 20 years’ international PR experience gained at leading agencies and in-house. He has specialised in aviation and travel for a decade, devising and overseeing successful international PR programmes and building 80:20 Communications into an acclaimed sector specialist.

Article Author Marc Cornelius